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The Rough Guide To Turkey [VERIFIED]



The friendliness of the Turkish people makes visiting a pleasure; indeed you risk causing offence by declining invitations, and find yourself making friends through the simplest of transactions. At the big resorts and tourist spots, of course, this can merely be an excuse to sell you something, but elsewhere, despite a history in which outsiders have so often brought trouble, the warmth and generosity are genuine.




The Rough Guide to Turkey


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There's been very little exploration of Turkish music in the West, and on the basis of this you have to hope there'll be a lot more in the future. This disc covers the waterfront, from the pop sounds of Sezen Aksu and Ebru Gündes to the tortuous (yet playful) time signatures of Laco Tayfa & Hüsnü Senlendirici and the brooding sound of the Barbaros Erköse Ensemble, with Erköse, one of the country's leading musicians and a stunning clarinetist, at the helm. It's a carefully sequenced disc, moving slowly from straightforward Turkish pop -- which is no copy of Western sounds -- through gypsy music to Sufi sounds. The pivotal point is the very political Grup Yorum, whose "Haydi Kolkola" is ready accessible, but has a distinct roots edge. And from there, it moves to a rawer sound, such as Kemani Cemal Cinarli's "Mavisim," with its remarkable solos on hammered dulcimer and violin. Truth to tell, there's not a bad track on here, and compiler Dan Rosenberg has done an excellent job of illustrating how the different styles of music in Turkey have influenced and bled into each other, and the way both the Middle East and Europe have shaped it. A fascinating journey through an underexposed culture.


The Rough Guide to Turkey is a must for all discerning travellers heading to this fascinating country that straddles Europe and Asia. The most comprehensive and informed travel guide on the market, offering insightful coverage taking readers from the stunning trails of the Lycian Way on the Turquoise coast to the iconic dome of Aya Sofia, and from legendary sites such as Troy and Ephesus to the fairytale landscapes of Cappadocia.


Packed with practical advice on everything from how to buy the finest kilims (rugs) to details on catching dolmuses, The Rough Guide to Turkey has all you need to find the best places to stay and eat, with trusted reviews you can rely on and options to suit all budgets. Complete with stunning photography, itineraries to help plan your trip and detailed maps to navigate your way through even the most maze-like towns, it's easy to see why The Rough Guide to Turkey is such an invaluable addition to your suitcase.


This fully revised and thoroughly updated sixth edition of the Rough Guide to Turkey is your ultimate handbook to this fascinating country.A full colour section introduces Turkey's highlights, from the markets of Istanbul to the rock churches of Cappadocia. There are informed accounts of the country's wide-ranging sights and incisive reviews of the best places to eat, sleep and drink in every price range. Throughout the guide there is practical advice on everything from bazaar shopping to chartering a yacht. The authors also provide expert background on Turkish history, literature, music and film and the guide comes complete with easy-to-read maps for every region.


The SCUBA Diving is great and the beaches are okay. It is hot all day, so the majority of people go outside in the mornings because it is the nicest part of the day and avoid the midday heat. Word to the wise if you are with a girlfriend/wife etc. -stay close to her if you visit the markets. The men can and will get physical if your not careful. Best to retain a personal travel guide. Currency wise the Euro trades better on the street compared to the Dollar.


Both because of Western criticism and for its own reasons, Turkey appears to be scaling down the objectives of its costly operation and paving the way for withdrawal. Former Turkish military chief Necip Torumtay, among others, has warned that an extended occupation could be counterproductive, since it could lead to clashes between Turkish forces and the Iraqi Kurds. Indeed, it is a good bet that Turkish Prime Minister Tansu Ciller will give President Clinton at least a rough timetable for withdrawal when the two leaders meet tomorrow at the White House.


Two points should guide Western policy. First, the West's interests lie with Turkey. Ankara has been a loyal NATO ally, a strategic partner in the Gulf war, and the host of Operation Provide Comfort (OPC), whose planes protect Iraqi Kurds from Saddam Hussein. It is a source of stability in the Middle East, an important future partner in our ties with resource-rich Central Asia, and a key bulwark against a resurgence of Russian imperialism. Most important, Turkey has long been the most democratic government in the Islamic world. Its democratic efforts, however imperfect, deserve to be rewarded and nurtured.


By contrast, the terrorist PKK is trained in Lebanon's Syrian-controlled Bekaa Valley and supported by three sponsors of terrorism: Iran, Iraq, and particularly Syria. The PKK targets not only the Turkish military but also state officials and others -- including teachers, whom it accuses of purveying state propaganda -- and their families. Its persistent attacks on Turkish institutions throughout Europe led both France and Germany to ban the organization in 1993.


Carrying out reform while fighting terrorists is treacherous. Terrorists can mistake reform for weakness. If Turkey is to follow through with its reforms, it should know that its friends fully support its right to oppose terror and protect its borders.


Strong condemnation of the Turkish regime this week as MEPs denounced its attempts to censor criticism over its military assault of Afrin in Syria. Calling for an end to Turkey's current state of emergency, they said funds earmarked for pre-membership aid should be conditional on improving its record on human rights and the rule of law. Turkey's leader Recep Tayyip Erdogan is set for a rough ride at an EU-Turkey leaders' meeting next month. Whether this will affect the EU's commitment to its deal with Turkey on migration, however, remains to be seen. More ...Regards,Nick PragPublisher, EUbusiness


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